The Blog

Jeff Voudrie’s Stock Market Commentary – End of Life Care, March 27, 2017

Jeff Voudrie’s Stock Market Commentary – End of Life Care, March 27, 2017

What I discovered should be shocking to anyone who thinks that their end of life care decisions will be respected…

Over the years I have helped clients establish Revocable Living Trusts. Typically, a trust includes documents like a Power of Attorney for Financial Assets that appoints someone to make financial decisions on your behalf in the event you become incapacitated.

The trust package should also include a Power of Attorney for Health Care in which you name the person(s) that you want to decide your health care decisions if/when you are unable to.

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Jeff Voudrie’s Stock Market Commentary – The Trump Rally and Continued US & Global Growth 3-16-17

Jeff Voudrie’s Stock Market Commentary – The Trump Rally and Continued US & Global Growth 3-16-17

Jeff’s Stock Market Commentary: Continued US & Global Growth

Is The Trump Rally Over?

Summary: Although the US major stock markets are at or near all-time highs, the economic data signals continued US and global growth. My viewpoint is that we are still in the early stages of what could be a multi-year growth cycle.

If you listen to the talking heads on the business news channels it is likely that you will come away thinking that the market is overbought and on the verge of another crash reminiscent of 2000-2003 or 2008. As I talk with people (not my clients) I tend to hear the same thing—the markets are too high—then they talk about something like ‘valuation’. Granted, it is hard to argue that there is more upside potential ahead when the markets are already at all-time highs.

I distinctly remember making a similar argument in June and July of 2015 and back then the market drifted down throughout the summer and declined around 15% in August of that year.

So what makes it different now from back then?

The economic data.  In June of 2015 the economy was already starting to show signs of slowing after a multi-year period of growth.  As I’ve said in previous commentaries, my analysis of how to invest starts by looking at whether the economic tide is coming in or going out.

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Jeff Voudrie’s Weekly Stock Market Commentary – The Economic Climate

Jeff Voudrie’s Weekly Stock Market Commentary – The Economic Climate

The Economic Climate Has Changed and How You Should Be Invested

Each money manager and/or investor has a process that helps them determine when, how and how much to invest. The process that I use starts by looking at whether the United States and/or global economy is expanding or contracting.

In other words, I first try to determine whether the global and/or US economic tide is coming in or going out. In a growth-slowing environment, there is more risk than reward in trying to capture the return of the S&P 500. In a growth-growing environment, we want to more closely track the S&P 500 (or similar equity indexes) because that is where the best risk/reward equation is.

If the economic tide is coming in, then I want to be invested in stocks and bonds that act like stocks; if the economic tide is going out, I want to avoid most stocks and invest more heavily in bonds.

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Jeff Voudrie’s Stock Market Commentary: Trump The Chaos Candidate

Jeff Voudrie’s Stock Market Commentary: Trump The Chaos Candidate

Donald Trump the ‘Chaos Candidate’

Last week I read a book that referred to Donald Trump as the ‘Chaos Candidate’. What we have witnessed in the last two weeks sure fits the definition of chaos:

We have seen contentious nominee hearings.

We have seen Democrats boycott the hearings to delay votes, thus very few votes have occurred for his nominees.

The Republicans at the meeting in Philadelphia seem to be singing the same establishment tune they have been for months/years. (and that has resulted in low approval ratings)

Now we have a Supreme Court nominee where President Trump is already suggesting using the ‘nuclear option’ to get Gorsuch appointed. Doing so could possibly change the threshold of all future Supreme Court nominations.

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